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zarin taslima
Jul 18, 2022
In General Discussions
Thanks to technology, overlooking the Pacific Islands from the air, Taiwan and Japan are dazzling green pearls in a series of island arcs. People established settlements in the plains, and the population concentrated along the river banks and gradually developed into cities. Beginning in the 1960s, the island country began to rapidly industrialize. 90% of Japan's urban population is mainly concentrated in Honshu. Tokyo, together with the outer ports of Yokohama, Chiba, Saitama, and Kanagawa prefectures, has a population of 38 million in the metropolitan area, making it one of the world's largest cities. The largest mega city; similarly, the banner design urban population of Taiwan exceeds 70%, and the western plains form a densely populated area of ​​man-made objects. The Taipei-Hsinchu-Beitai metropolitan area has a population of nearly 10 million. In the past, the economic miracle of East Asia was widely praised by the world. However, things have changed, and both island countries will face challenges in the new era such as climate change, industrial transformation, and population reduction. It seems that they can no longer rely on the guidance of traditional national elites. Advanced technology and navigation systems are urgently needed. to guide the future. In particular, a series of new concepts and practices, such as AI technology, knowledge economy, community building, place creation, and social design, are in full swing in the two places, especially the changes in the social economy and spatial structure caused by the aging of the population and fewer children. Inheriting the research foundation of the "Reverse Urbanization Era" of Takashi Ohshiro of the University of Tokyo, the community buildingof Yukio Nishimura, and the research foundation of Hiroya Yasaku of Ryugu University's "shrinking the city", Professor Nobu Yingba of Tokyo Metropolitan University of Japan is the founder of this wave of declining urban research in the Mesozoic era. One of the best, with the theme of "fold up", he combines the norms of urban planning and the autonomy of community building to explain the possibility of "porous cities" in the future. The so-called "folded cities" refer to the concentration of populations in specific livable cities through individual or community action (pp. 73-74), while porosity refers to the random vacancies or vacancies left by households whose population has declined. building.
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